Hip Hop Collections on display at the Schomburg

Wonderful Hip Hop archives were on display at the Schomburg Center during the Hip Hop Think Tank 3 Conference November 9th and 10th, as a part of the month long celebration of Hip Hop History.  On display in Harlem NY on 135th St., where two major collections one by Cornell University and the other by Khalid el-Hakim.

Cornell’s collection featured special archived posters from Afrika Bambaataa, and a digital exhibition of the photographs of Joe Conzo. The entire collection started in 2007 housed at Cornell University Library claims to be the largest of its kind with over 100,000 pieces including; photographs, manuscripts, sound recordings, film and video, event flyers, record label press packets and publicity, art work, magazines, books, posters and more.

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Easy A.D. with the Cornell Hip Hop Collection

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Detroit educator, Khalid el-Hakim displayed part of his 5,000 piece Black History 101 Mobile Museum Pop Up exhibit at the Schomburg Center during the Hip Hop Think Tank 3 event on Saturday and Sunday. Rare newspapers, magazines, photos, albums and other ephemera from the Black Power and Black Arts eras were on display with Hip Hop artifacts and memorabilia.

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Khalid el-Hakim Black History 101 Mobile Museum

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The Shaolin Jazz art project produced by Gerald Watson and DJ 2-Tone presented an ensemble piece of music and commissioned work by Aniekan Udofia on 12×14 and 16×20 canvas. The  stencil and freehand designs incorporate martial arts, Hip Hop and Jazz on about a dozen originals displayed throughout the Schomburg Library Center.

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DJ 2-Tone and Gerald Watson

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The Schomburg Library Center has its own collection of art on display in multiple galleries as well as a library research center where anyone can come to study. It’s located on 135th Street in Harlem, NY across from Harlem hospital and the #2 train.

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Kurt Nice

Kurt Nice aka Kurtiss Jackson is a behind the scenes pioneer in the Hip Hop Kulture, creating the first nationally distributed video mix tape series, Shades of Hip Hop, in the late 1990s. Since touring the country with the Stop the Violence Movement and the Temple of Hip Hop as KRS-ONE’s National Marketing Director, Kurt Nice has been a constant commentator on conscious Hip Hop and its relevance to the new rap music of today, through radio and cable appearances. contact Kurt at info@hiphoplives.net

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Kurt Nice aka Kurtiss Jackson is a behind the scenes pioneer in the Hip Hop Kulture, creating the first nationally distributed video mix tape series, Shades of Hip Hop, in the late 1990s. Since touring the country with the Stop the Violence Movement and the Temple of Hip Hop as KRS-ONE's National Marketing Director, Kurt Nice has been a constant commentator on conscious Hip Hop and its relevance to the new rap music of today, through radio and cable appearances. contact Kurt at info@hiphoplives.net

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Posted in 9 Elements, events, Hip Hop, hiphoplives.net, Recent Posts, shadesradio.com
5 comments on “Hip Hop Collections on display at the Schomburg
  1. Vintage Harlem Hip Hop video and audio will be presented along the way – old school hip hop culture will come to life on this tour.

  2. Gold Price says:

    These rare images capture Hip Hop when it was still a localized, grassroots culture about to explode into global awareness. Without Joe’s images, the world would have little idea of what the earliest era of hip hop looked like, when fabled DJ, MC, and b-boy/girl battles took place in parks, school gymnasiums and neighborhood discos.

  3. These rare images capture Hip Hop when it was still a localized, grassroots culture about to explode into global awareness. Without Joe’s images, the world would have little idea of what the earliest era of hip hop looked like, when fabled DJ, MC, and b-boy/girl battles took place in parks, school gymnasiums and neighborhood discos.

  4. Jamaal Wong says:

    Today, Ralph J. Bunche and his accomplishment often fall below the radar of our consciousness of influential African Americans. However, in the 1940s, ‘50s, and ‘60s, Bunche was a hyper visible fixture whose dedication to decolonization, trusteeship, integration, and international peace, placed him at the forefront of leaders fighting toward equality. Bunche, who was characteristically humble, recognized that his visibility and privilege could be used to promote his racial progression platform. He believed that he was not free until his black audience was free too. The media, however, did not read Bunche’s visibility the same way. They saw Bunche and his success to be proof of the “Horatio Alger myth,” and believed that racism was dead and that any lack of progress in the black community, or the “negro problem,” was its own fault. Despite this contention, Ralph J. Bunche remains a very important figure in African-American, and American History. His selected speeches, writings, and papers , can be viewed here at the Schomburg center.

  5. Jill Shields says:

    Rock The Bells, once the nation’s most celebrated hip hop festival, is down for the count. Here are some reasons why.

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