During the Poison Pen interview a scuffle broke out

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Here’s a clip from the upcoming photo journal called Undaground Seen. The full color book is filled with quick captures from the Hip Hop underground in NY and NJ in 2008. One of the times discussed, is when we recorded the interview with Poison Pen at the Bowery Poetry Club. While we talked, a small fight broke out and we were forced to shut it down. Listening to it now is kinda funny when the club manager starts yelling, “Everybody Out!” The interview was extremely insightful, as Pen broke down touring the underground hip-hop scene. In the background, you can hear the chicks complaining about their set or something right before the disturbance. As usual, its one of those one way in spots and the action comes right past us out the front door.

 

Kurt Nice

Kurt Nice aka Kurtiss Jackson is a behind the scenes pioneer in the Hip Hop Kulture, creating the first nationally distributed video mix tape series, Shades of Hip Hop, in the late 1990s. Since touring the country with the Stop the Violence Movement and the Temple of Hip Hop as KRS-ONE’s National Marketing Director, Kurt Nice has been a constant commentator on conscious Hip Hop and its relevance to the new rap music of today, through radio and cable appearances. contact Kurt at info@hiphoplives.net

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21 thoughts on “During the Poison Pen interview a scuffle broke out”

  1. True school Hip-Hop movement DLTLLY (Dont Let the Label Label You) have recently presented a brand new feature which is an exclusive “RA the Rugged Man” interview and recap of his live performance during his UK tour. DLTLLY ask Rugged Man about the new album “Legends Never Die” specifically the creative process and which tracks he spent more time on. Rugged Man goes on to answer questions about the music industry and more. Feel free to browse the HHK archives for previous DLTLLY work including a feature with Stig of the Dump and more. You can watch DLTLLY – RA the Rugged Man Interview on the youtube player below.

  2. Lane Rodgers says:

    Today Alexander is a DJ on a local radio station in Omaha that hosts an independent music show featuring hip hop, and he facilitates an elementary school program that teaches students about hip hop called the “Culture Shock School Tour”.

  3. Get Smart says:

    TONEDEFF – A staple of the new underground hip hop scene, Tonedeff takes some time to give State residents advice and suggestions on recording audio via PC and more. Tonedeff is also an avid producer. Read the entire Tonedeff interview with The State here.

  4. Before she was added to the cast for Love & Hip Hop’s third season, Jen The Pen was first asked to be a part of hip hop media reality show, The Gossip Game . In a recent interview with our very own Emily Exton , the reality star gave her thoughts on the VH1 landscape, women in hip hop media, and her dreams for the future.

  5. Gold Price says:

    Hugely successful independent artist Tech N9ne talks about the problem he has with critics when they look at him as an artist who has needed “gimmicks” to fuel his career. This isn’t the first time this has happened to a successful hip hop artist. I used to feel the same way about Busta Rhymes back in the day. Busta’s skills were far greater than hip hop critics gave him credit for. But because Busta was very much the visual artist, I felt that this kept him from being mentioned among other great MC’s. But don’t get me wrong, I’m not putting tech in the league with Busta, but I do understand his gripe.

  6. This interview was conducted in October 2000. Guru was a lynchpin in my adolsecent interest in hip hop, so I was very excited about talking to him (I was 22 at the time). I’ll always remember this interview not so much for the content but for Guru’s incredible eloquence and ability to bring any question I asked him back to his message about his new album (not all of which I typed up!). He struck me as a very intelligent, thoughtful person – someone who was in love with his artform. Rest In Peace, Guru.

    1. Kurt Nice says:

      I got a chance to interview Guru as well not long before he passed away.

  7. AKIR is an African-American hip hop artist/producer/songwriter known for his dense lyrics and socially aware content. His pen name is an acronym for “Always Keep It Real”. He is also the CEO/co-owner of One Enterprises.

  8. B.o.B is getting back into the swing of things when it comes to hip-hop music, and he’s been doing quite a few interviews. The rapper recently revealed the title of his upcoming third studio album, Underground Luxury, which he discussed while visiting The Breakfast Club on Power 105.

  9. Jacob Rivera says:

    This, coupled with his victories in numerous freestyle rap competitions of the New York underground hip hop scene such as Rocksteady Anniversary, Braggin Rites and others, led to his reputation as a ferocious Battle MC.

  10. Susie Kent says:

    Today Alexander is a DJ on a local radio station in Omaha that hosts an independent music show featuring hip hop, and he facilitates an elementary school program that teaches students about hip hop called the “Culture Shock School Tour”.

  11. This, coupled with his victories in numerous freestyle rap competitions of the New York underground hip hop scene such as Rocksteady Anniversary, Braggin Rites and others, led to his reputation as a ferocious Battle MC.

  12. This, coupled with his victories in numerous freestyle rap competitions of the New York underground hip hop scene such as Rocksteady Anniversary, Braggin Rites and others, led to his reputation as a ferocious Battle MC.

  13. Now there’s a lot of underground [MCs] who remain underground and they do it because they want to. And then there’s some who want to go mainstream but they don’t know how to do it. We gotta spoon-feed a lot of the fans and stuff because a lot of them are like – I don’t wanna hear that, I don’t wanna be taught, I’m out hear doing what I gotta do and this and that. But once you let them know that you’re one of them and you come from where they come from [then they can accept what you’re saying]. There’s a difference between someone saying “yo, stop hustling, you’re gonna go to jail” as opposed to having you speak to someone who just came out [of jail]. And that’s the kind of energy that I like to give. Understand that I’m just a fan with a deal. I’m one of you guys at the end of the day.

  14. Well, this was hella awkward. Hot 97 was interviewing cast members from Love & Hip Hop New York and in between segments, Joe Budden confronted Consequence and Jen The Pen about comments they had said about him during interviews.

  15. TONEDEFF – A staple of the new underground hip hop scene, Tonedeff takes some time to give State residents advice and suggestions on recording audio via PC and more. Tonedeff is also an avid producer. Read the entire Tonedeff interview with The State here.

  16. Well, this was hella awkward. Hot 97 was interviewing cast members from Love & Hip Hop New York and in between segments, Joe Budden confronted Consequence and Jen The Pen about comments they had said about him during interviews.

  17. Doreen Weeks says:

    While I was there I worked in a few aspects of the relief effort including a solidarity mission to aid the Earthquake survivors. In addition to all of this Myself, Cormega and Styles P participated in a show to support Haitian Hip Hop and rebuild the community. I would like to thank Arms Around Haiti and Hip Hop for Haiti for inviting me to be a part of this movement. While I was there I saw both devastation and rebuilding efforts. I also broke bread with people who had lost their entire family. Literally, everyone but them was deceased. Then there were those whose grief centered around losing a mother, father, brother, sister, son, or daughter as a direct result of what happened. It should make everyone reading this feel blessed to have anyone in his or her life. Think about that… Now think about it some more.

    1. Kurt Nice says:

      That’s deep. I’m glad you posted that. People don’t really get a chance to think about things like that too often. People are so caught up thinking they have so much stress and their life is so hard never realizing people around them may have it much worse. That was probably a great learning experience despite the devastation you saw. Thanks for sharing that. One

  18. No one’s from the old school, ’cause rap on a whole isn’t even thirty years old. Fifty years down the line you can start this then we’ll be the old school artists. Even in that time, I’ll say a rhyme a brand new style, ruthless and wild. Runnin’ around, spending money having fun But even then, I’m still number one!

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